FAQ's

Here you will find the most frequently asked questions about our products. If you still do not find what you are looking for, please complete our enquiry form.

First Response Questions

Faint line, is this a positive result?

Yes.  However faint, as long as there is a second line present this is a positive result.

How soon can a pregnancy be detected?

Your doctor can perform blood tests that will accurately diagnose pregnancy several days before you missed your period, or your doctor may opt to conduct a urine test a day or so later. Home pregnancy tests, like the FIRST RESPONSE® Early Result Pregnancy Test, are also a great option. FIRST RESPONSE® Early Result Pregnancy Test can detect pregnancy as early as 6 days sooner than the day of your missed period. Knowing as early as possible will allow you to get a healthy start to your pregnancy and your baby´s life.

I just found out I'm pregnant. Now what?

The first thing you should do is make an appointment to see your medical professional. Your midwife or doctor can provide you with much of the information you will need to know about the months ahead. Learning that you are pregnant should serve as encouragement for you to adopt healthy lifestyle habits. Avoid using drugs, cigarettes, alcohol and caffeine to the best of your ability. If you are currently taking medications (prescription or over-the-counter), be sure to discuss possible effects they may have on you and your baby when you see your midwife or doctor.

What can I do about morning sickness?

Answered by the Fertility Nutritionist Expert Yvonne Bishop-Weston

Morning sickness can be one of the more unpleasant aspects of your pregnancy. However, you can do several things to ease the discomfort it causes, including:

• Get plenty of rest.
• Move slowly in the morning, as nausea may worsen with quick movements.
• Eat foods that you know agree with you to avoid the nausea often caused by an empty stomach. Avoid irritants such as caffeine or spicy foods.
• Keep a diary each day to help you determine what improves your condition, as well as what seems to make it worse.
• Ginger has been shown to help relieve sickness. It´s safe to use in pregnancy and you can take it in several forms. Try ginger tea, ginger ale or ginger biscuits.
• Small, frequent snacks can help alleviate your symptoms. Avoid large meals, especially those high in fat, as they´ll put a greater strain on your digestive system.
• Don´t let your stomach remain empty for more than a couple of hours. Have a dry crispbread, cracker or piece of plain toast to keep your system ´ticking over´.

If you find yourself losing weight or suffering from dehydration due to your morning sickness, consult your doctor to make sure you are still absorbing all necessary nutrition for you and your baby. In some cases, your doctor may prescribe medication to ease your discomfort.

I currently use birth control pills as a contraceptive. Will I have trouble conceiving once I've stopped taking them?

You should discuss this with your doctor first. Although some studies suggest there might be a delay of several months before ovulation begins, particularly for older women, other studies show no such evidence. The pill may even enhance your fertility by protecting you against pelvic inflammatory disease and possibly endometriosis. Some studies suggest you should wait 1-2 months after stopping the pill before trying to get pregnant.

Can I still exercise during pregnancy?

You must discuss this with your doctor. Generally, however, exercise will prove beneficial both to you and your unborn baby, as it improves muscle strength, muscle tone, and flexibility. It promotes a sense of well-being and enhances self-esteem. Weight-bearing exercise helps develop and preserve bone, and aerobic exercise helps stave off cardiovascular disease. Normal exercise will not bring about complications or miscarriage, though common sense suggests that you should not run more than a few miles a week or participate in rigorous activity after about 20-22 weeks into your pregnancy. Use your own judgment as to how much exercise may be too much for you, or create a well-balanced exercise program with your doctor.